October Update

Children’s education

With the generous support of our donors, Sunrise Uganda UK is currently funding the education of 10 children. The third trimester commenced on 18 September and will run until 8 December. End of term exams will take place in mid-November. These are critical exams which will determine whether children will be promoted to the next grade in 2018. Schools will be hosting a Parents’ Day next week to discuss the academic progress of the children. Moses Taifa, Director of Sunrise Uganda, will attend to hear the progress of those children we are supporting.

Earlier in the term, children participated in an awareness raising event on gender-based violence and female genital mutilation (sadly, still a widespread practice in some communities). Moses spoke at the event. Some photos are below.

IMG_2870
Sunrise Uganda Director, Moses Taifa, speaking at an awareness raising event on gender-based violence and FGM.
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Children playing netball during the event.

Livelihood support

The livelihood activities financed by 1% For Development Fund continue to generate incomes for families of the sponsored children. In this update, we provide information on matooke trading, as well as chicken, pig and goat rearing activities.

Matooke trading operation

Fariza Yapkwobei is a single parent, caring for eight children. She was struggling to provide them with food and shelter, let alone education. She received a grant of 800,000 Ugandan Shillings (~170GBP) to establish a matooke trading operation. She buys matooke locally and then transports it to the main market in Kaserem district where prices are high and it is a nationally-renowned place to buy the crop. The business has become a success and is providing a regular income. Fariza has used the profits from her trading business to purchase a small cow and bean seeds. The planted beans were harvested four months later and used to feed her family, with excess production sold for profit. The cow provides milk and can eventually also be sold. As such, Fariza is now running a small business with multiple income streams. This exemplifies the transformative effect that small grants and some business training can have on people’s ability to generate their own income and, in turn, define their own future. Fariza says: “I encourage more women to emulate my business and to learn to be enterprising in order to feed their families and rid the community of poverty.”

Matooke
Matooke at a roadside stall.
Fariza Yapkwobei and cow
Fariza with beans and her cow purchased with profits from the matooke trading enterprise.

Chicken rearing

Joan Chelangat is a beneficiary from a chicken rearing grant. She is a single parent of five children and has an additional two orphans entrusted to her care. The grant funded the purchase of the chickens, feed and vaccinations – and construction of a shelter. Joan says: “Hens, like any other living creature, need affection. That’s why I make sure that I release them the shelter constructed by Sunrise at least one hour a day. When I want them to gather for feeding or to return them to their house, I just call them and they hurry to me. This cordial relation between my hens and I is yielding dividends. Now they began laying eggs and one of them already hatched seven chicks. My life was not good before Sunrise supported me. Now I sell eggs and fattened cocks. I used the money received to buy food, clothes and provide scholastic materials for my children.”

Joan chelangat and chickens
Joan Chelangat and her chickens purchased with the grant facilitated by Sunrise.

 

Goat rearing

Sania is an HIV positive widow. When her husband succumbed to AIDS, his family inherited their livestock and she was left to care for six children without any means of income. Sania is one of 10 beneficiaries who have received three goats each. The beneficiaries are now breeding the goats and the total stock is expected to double to 60 by year-end. Beneficiaries can sustain their livelihood by selling the bred goats for profit. Sania says: “I had low immunity and was taking antiretrovirals. I had lost hope when Sunrise came to visit. Now I see hope for my life and the future of my family seems bright since there are people in the world who seem to care about me.”

Madina and goat
Sunrise Director Moses Taifa handing over goats to Sania.

Pig farming

Lucy Chelangat is widow and beneficiary of the pig farming activity. She was provided 10 pigs, the construction of the pig shelter and sunflower cake as feed. The prolonged drought in the area has made is challenging to source affordable feed, but the beneficiaries are confident that pigs will start multiplying later in the year and can be sold for profit. Lucy says: “Government Lodge [the hotel where visiting officials, including the President, stay] is in the area, so the demand for pork is high. I expect to gain a lot from the pigs due to their rapid breeding rates. Imagine: only one pig can produce to a tune of 15 piglets. This will help me buy land and educated my children until university.”

 

Pigs
Lucy’s pigs.

Funding update and next steps

Many of you have already generously contributed in recent months – for which we express our heartfelt thanks. This money will be used to fund next year’s activities in Uganda. In December we will take stock of our financial position and determine how to spend the money raised.

As we have mentioned, our number one priority was to ensure adequate funding to ensure that the 10 children we are sponsoring can remain in school in 2018. We are on track to achieve this goal thanks to your generosity.

Our colleagues in Uganda report that there are daily visits to the Sunrise offices by families and children in need of support.  These are left on a waiting list pending receipt of more funding. We would dearly love to be able expand our support to more children and families.

If you wish to donate, please follow the instructions here: https://sunriseugandauk.wordpress.com/donations/

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